Increased oceanic microplastic debris enhances oviposition in an endemic pelagic insect

Halobates sericeus. Photo by Anthony Smith  Halobates eggs on plastic


Read the scientific article

Goldstein, M. C., M. Rosenberg, and L. Cheng. 2012. Increased oceanic microplastic debris enhances oviposition in an endemic pelagic insect. Biology Letters. Published online 9 May 2012. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0298.

Download the data

Press release

Behind-the-scenes blog post

Selected media coverage

Print
Al Jazeera
BBC
Business Insider
Conservation Magazine
The Economist
Fondriest Environmental
Grist Magazine
Inter Press Service
io9
Live Science
MSNBC
North County Times
Not Exactly Rocket Science
NPR
The Onion
San Diego Union-Tribune
Science
Scientific American
US News & World Report
Wired
Yahoo News (AP)

Radio
Quirks & Quarks
PRI's The World; longer interview on The World Science Podcast

Video
The Weather Channel


Photo credits: Left: The marine insect Halobates sericeus, also known as a “sea skater” or “oceanic water strider.” Photo credit: Anthony Smith. Right: Examples of a not-yet-hatched sea skater (Halobates sericeus) egg (top), about the size of a grain of rice, and a hatched egg (bottom). Photo credit: Miriam Goldstein, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

 

Navigation